Saturday, March 30, 2013

Reference Books


          Reference Books
          I have a lot of reference books. They are about the Cherokee, the Catawba, the Melungeons, and others simply because they are History Books about places and eras that are related to my family. The following books have been valuable to me. These are but a portion. I will add more as I am able. If you’d like any references from any of them, email me and I’ll see what I can do. Vhawkins1952@gmail.com. This list will be growing over time.

          I. Cherokee  
          A. History
          1. “The Cherokee Nation, a History” by Robert J. Conley
          “History of the Cherokee Indians: Old Families and their Genealogy” by Emmitt Starr
          2. “The Journal of Rev. Daniel S. Butrick, May 19, 1838-Apr. 1, 1839; Trail of Tears Association, Oklahoma Chapter.
           3. “Footsteps of the Cherokees”, by Vicki Rozema, John. F. Blair Publishers, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
          4. “Colonel Return Jonathan Meigs Day Book Number 2” transcribed by James L. Doughat; Institute of Historic Research, Signal Mountain, Tennessee
           B. Genealogy
          1. “Guion Miller Roll “Plus of Eastern Cherokee East and West of Mississippi 1909” by Bob Blankenship; A Cherokee Roots Publication
          2. “Cherokee Proud” by Tony McClure, Pub. by Chunannee Books, Somerville, Tennessee
          3. Cherokee Roots, Vol. 1 and 2; by Bob Blankenship, Cherokee, North Carolina.
          4. “Cherokee Emigration Rolls 1817-1835” transcribed by Jack D. Baker; Baker Publishing Co., Oklahoma City.
5. “Cherokee Old Settlers; The 1896 Old Settler Payroll and the 1851 Old Settler Payroll transcribed and edited by David Keith Hampton; © David Keith Hampton 1993
          C. Sequoyah
          1. “The Mysteries of Sequoyah” by C. W. “Dub” West, bicentennial Edition, Muscogee Publishing Company, Muscogee, Oklahoma.
          2. “Sequoyah”, by Grant Foreman, University of Oklahoma Press
          3. “Se-Quo-Yah, The American Cadmus and Modern Moses: A Complete Biography of the greatest of Redmen (1885)” by George Everett Foster

           II. Eastern Siouan       
           A. Catawba
          1. “The Catawba Indian Nation of the Carolinas” by Thomas Blumer, Arcadia Publishing
          2. “Catawba Nation, Treasures in History” by Dr. Thomas J. Blumer; Pub. by The History Press
          3. “The Catawba Indians, People of the River”, by Douglas Summers Brown, University of South Carolina Press
          4. “The Indian’s New World; Catawba’s and Their Neighbors From European Contact Through the Era of Removal” by James H. Merrell; W. W. Norton and Company
           5. “History and Condition of the Catawba Indians of South Carolina” by Hazel Lewis Scaife
          B. Other Bands of the Catawba
          1. “Monacans and Miners” by Samuel R. Cook; University of Nebraska Press
          2. “Red Carolinians” by Chapman Milling, University of South Carolina Press
          3. “History of the Old Cheraws” by Alexander Gregg; Book Renaissance
          4. “Tutelo, Saponi, Nahyssan,Monacan, aka Piedmont Catawba Tribe of the OhioValley, Virginia,Carolina, New York, Pennsylvania, and Six Nations/Ontario, Canada”; compiled by Richard Haithcock, self published
          C. Melungeon
          1. “Melungeons, Examening an Appalachian Legend” by Pat Spurlock Elder; Continuity Press, 2004
          2. “Melungeons and Other Pioneer Families” by Jack Goins
          3. "Who’s Your People? Cumulative Identity Among the Salyersville Indian Population of Kentucky’s Appalachia and the Midwest Muckfields, 1677-2000, Vol. 1”, by Richard Allen Carlson, Jr.; a Dissertation submitted to Michigan State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, Department of Anthropology, 2003.
          III. History
          A. Oklahoma/Indian Territory, Arkansas and Texas
          1. "A Study in Tolerance with Genealogy", by William Lee McCormick; pub. by The Book Craft, Dallas, Texas
          2. “Jesse Chisholm, Ambassador of the Plains”, by Stan Hoig; University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma
          3. “The Last Trek of the Indians” by Grant Foreman; University of Chicago University
          4. “The Five Civilized Tribes” by Grant Foreman, University of Oklahoma Press
          5. “A Guide to the Indian Tribes of Oklahoma” by Muriel H. Wright, University of Oklahoma Press
          6. “A Tour on the Prairies” by Washington Irving; University of Oklahoma Press
          7. “Hanging Judge” by Fred Harrington, University of Oklahoma Press
          B. Tennessee, Alabama, Kentucky, the Virginia’s and the Carolina’s
          1. “Land of the Lake” by Dr. G. L. Ridenour, Campbell County Historical Society
          2. “South Fork Country”, by Samuel D. Perry, First Books
          3. “Records of the Moravians in North Carolina, Vol. 2”, edited by Adelaide L. Fries; A Publication of the North Carolina Historical Commission
          4. “Records of the Moravians Among the Cherokee, Vol. 1 1752-1802”, “Vol. 2 1802-1805” and “Vol. 3, 1805-1810”, edited by C. Daniel Crews and Richard W. Starbuck, pub. by Cherokee National Press
          5. “The Moravians in Georgia, 1735-1740”, edited by Adelaide L. Fries
          6. “Lethal Encounters, Englishmen and Indians in Colonial Virginia” by Alfred A. Cave; Praeger
          7. “Doublehead, the Last Chickamauga Cherokee Chief” by Rickey Butch Walker, Blue Water Publications
          8. “Warrior Mountain Folklore” by Ricky “Butch” Walker; funded by the United States Department of Education; Printed by Lawrence County Schools Indian Education Program, Moulton, Alabama
          9. “Chickasaw Chief George Colbert, His Family and His Country” by Ricky “Butch” Walker, Blue Water Publishing
          10. “Davey Crockett, His Own Story” by Davey Crockett; Applewood Books

          IV. Other Genealogy Books
          1. “Wayland File”, by Frances Davey
          2. “Christopher Gist of Maryland and Some of his Descendants 1679-1957” by Jean Meir Dorsey and Maxwell Jay Dorsey, John S. Swift Co., Chicago, Illinois

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